October 2015 Monthly Census at Ottawa NWR

Here is documentation of the fall migration as of October 4 at the Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge on Lake Erie. Thanks to Douglas Vogus., who published the monthly census on the OHIO-BIRDS email list.

OCTOBER 04, 2015 – Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Monthly Census.ROUTES: Same usual east & west side routes in the morning; Afternoon coverage limited due to youth waterfowl huntingon the refuge; quick run through the back side & then census the perimeters of the refuge on the back side.TIME: 8:00am-12:30pm; 1:45pm-5:15pm TEMP.: 44-70-64 COND.: Overcast until 9:15am; then turning partly to mostlysunny until 11:15am; mostly cloudy from 11:15am on; winds E/NE at 5-10mph.OBS.: Katie Clink (morning only), Donna Kuhn, Dave & Kim Myles (morning only), Ed Pierce, Jim Reyda,Al & Betty Schlecht (morning only) & Douglas W. Vogus.

I. MAMMALS: 3 SPECIES.
– Woodchuck – 2
– Eastern Fox Squirrel – 6
– White-tailed Deer – 4 (doe)

II. BIRDS: 106 SPECIES.
– Canada Goose – 698
– Trumpeter Swan – 31 (8 immature)
– Wood Duck – 38
– American Wigeon – 352
– American Black Duck – 8
– Mallard – 278
– Blue-winged Teal – 4
– Northern Shoveler – 7
– Green-winged Teal – 5
– Pied-billed Grebe – 26
– Double-crested Cormorant – 64
– Great Blue Heron – 128
– Great Egret – 100
– Snowy Egret – 2
– Turkey Vulture – 1
– Bald Eagle – 8 (2 adult,6 immature)
– Northern Harrier – 3
– Cooper’s Hawk – 1
– Red-tailed Hawk – 5
– Sora – 1
– Common Gallinule – 3
– American Coot – 1
– Sandhill Crane – 4
– Semipalmated Plover – 4
– Killdeer – 31
– Greater Yellowlegs – 15
– Lesser Yellowlegs – 5
– Stilt Sandpiper – 2
– Dunlin – 5
– Baird’s Sandpiper – 1
– Least Sandpiper – 3
– Pectoral Sandpiper – 5
– Semipalmated Sandpiper – 1
– Western Sandpiper – 2
– Long-billed Dowitcher – 5
– Wilson’s Snipe – 5
– Bonaparte’s Gull – 79
– Ring-billed Gull – 615
– Herring Gull – 10
– Caspian Tern – 2
– Common Tern – 22
– Forster’s Tern – 1
– Mourning Dove – 54
– Eastern Screech-Owl – 2
– Great Horned Owl – 1
– Chimney Swift – 1
– Belted Kingfisher – 1
– Red-bellied Woodpecker – 8
– Yellow-bellied Sapsucker – 2
– Downy Woodpecker – 18
– Hairy Woodpecker – 2
– Northern Flicker – 25
– American Kestrel – 1
– Peregrine Falcon – 1 (adult)
– Olive-sided Flycatcher – 1
– Eastern Wood-Pewee – 3
– Empidonax Flycatcher – 2
– Eastern Phoebe – 6
– White-eyed Vireo – 1
– Blue-headed Vireo – 5
– Red-eyed Vireo – 2
– Blue Jay – 47
– Horned Lark – 26
– Tree Swallow – 708
– Black-capped Chickadee – 6
– White-breasted Nuthatch – 11
– Brown Creeper – 1
– House Wren – 6
– Winter Wren – 2
– Marsh Wren – 3
– Golden-crowned Kinglet – 39
– Ruby-crowned Kinglet – 111
– Gray-cheeked Thrush – 2
– Swainson’s Thrush – 14
– Hermit Thrush – 1
– American Robin – 80
– Gray Catbird – 8
– Brown Thrasher – 2
– European Starling – 308
– Cedar Waxwing – 18
– Tennessee Warbler – 2
– Orange-crowned Warbler – 1
– Nashville Warbler – 1
– Common Yellowthroat – 2
– American Redstart – 1
– Palm Warbler – 3
– Pine Warbler – 1
– Yellow-rumped Warbler – 82
– Eastern Towhee – 1
– Savannah Sparrow – 1
– Song Sparrow – 18
– Lincoln’s Sparrow – 7
– Swamp Sparrow – 19
– White-throated Sparrow – 131
– White-crowned Sparrow – 27
– Dark-eyed Junco – 17
– Unidentified Sparrow – 8 (Adam Grimm Prairie & Stange Prairie – combined)
– Northern Cardinal – 18
– Indigo Bunting – 1
– Bobolink – 9 (5 in Adam Grimm Prairie & 4 in Stange Prairie)
– Red-winged Blackbird – 1,258
– Eastern Meadowlark – 1 (Adam Grimm Prairie)
– Rusty Blackbird – 5
– Common Grackle – 2,253
– Brown-headed Cowbird – 121
– American Goldfinch – 40
– House Sparrow – 22

III. REPTILES: 1 SPECIES.
– Midland Painted Turtle – 4

IV. AMPHIBIANS: 2 SPECIES.
– Bullfrog – 1
– Northern Leopard Frog – 6

V. BUTTERFLIES: 7 SPECIES.
– Cabbage Butterfly – 7
– Clouded Sulphur – 11
– Bronze Copper – 1 (Adam Grimm Prairie)
– Red Admiral – 2
– Buckeye – 1 (Adam Grimm Prairie)
– Viceroy – 1
– Monarch – 4

Douglas W. Vogus – Akron, Ohio.

Posted in Other Vectors | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Destinations – Detroit River Hawk Watch

An osprey soars over the Detroit River Hawk Watch at Lake Erie Metro Park. [Source: Andrew Sturgess | DRHW Facebook Group]

An osprey soars over the Detroit River Hawk Watch at Lake Erie Metro Park. [Source: Andrew Sturgess | DRHW Facebook Group]

  • Detroit River HawkCount
    The Detroit River Hawk Watch (a joint venture of the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge and its Friends group, the International Wildlife Refuge Alliance) is the Boat Launch at Lake Erie Metropark located approximately 20 miles south of Detroit, Michigan. The location is at the mouth of the Detroit River as it enters Lake Erie.
  • Detroit River Hawk Watch
    During the autumn months, the lower Detroit River (MI) becomes a corridor for the passage of migratory birds, and has gained international recognition for the annual volume of birds of prey. Hundreds of thousands of migrating hawks, eagles, falcons, and vultures are concentrated at this location where it is possible to systematically count them each year. A standardized monitoring program is conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge (DRIWR) and its friends group, the International Wildlife Refuge Alliance (IWRA).
  • Facebook Group – Detroit River Hawk Watch

Other Hawk Count sites I follow:

 

Posted in Places | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

September 2015 Monthly Census at Ottawa NWR

Here is documentation of the fall migration as of September 6 at the Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge on Lake Erie. Thanks to Douglas Vogus., who published the monthly census on the OHIO-BIRDS email list. I publish it here so I can marvel at the detail, especially the butterfly count!

SEPTEMBER 06, 2015 – Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Monthly Census. ROUTES: Same usual morning and afternoon routes. TIME: 8:00am-12:10pm; 1:40pm-6:50pm TEMP.: 68-89COND.: Warm early turning sunny, hot & humid.OBS.: Mike Edgington, Donna Kuhn, Dave & Kim Myles (morning only), Ed Pierce, Jim Reyda, Al & Betty Schlecht (morning only),Tony Szilagye (morning only) & Douglas W. Vogus.

I. MAMMALS: 5 SPECIES.
– Raccoon – 1
– Woodchuck – 1
– Eastern Fox Squirrel – 2
– Muskrat – 1
– White-tailed Deer – 3

II. BIRDS: 112 SPECIES.
– Canada Goose – 513
– Trumpeter Swan – 40 (neckbands: green “74M”; yellow “1A0”; yellow “9A0″)
– Wood Duck – 42
– American Wigeon – 4
– American Black Duck – 16
– Mallard – 217
– Blue-winged Teal – 198
– Northern Shoveler – 4
– Northern Pintail – 3
– Green-winged Teal – 23
– Hooded Merganser – 1 (female)
– Ruddy Duck – 1 (male)
– Pied-billed Grebe – 35
– Double-crested Cormorant – 52
– Least Bittern – 1
– Great Blue Heron – 77
– Great Egret – 231
– Snowy Egret – 6
– Green Heron – 4
– Black-crowned Night-Heron – 11
– Bald Eagle – 4 (2 adult,2 immature)
– Northern Harrier – 1
– Cooper’s Hawk – 1
– Red-tailed Hawk – 7
– Sora – 3
– Common Gallinule – 6
– Sandhill Crane – 5
– Semipalmated Plover – 2
– Killdeer – 44
– Spotted Sandpiper – 2
– Greater Yellowlegs – 12
– Lesser Yellowlegs – 23
– Stilt Sandpiper – 8
– Pectoral Sandpiper – 8
– Long-billed Dowitcher – 2
– Wilson’s Snipe – 1
– Red-necked Phalarope – 5 (all together in Moist Soil Unit 3 – no public access)
– Bonaparte’s Gull – 1
– Ring-billed Gull – 230
– Herring Gull – 8
– Caspian Tern – 31
– Common Tern – 5
– Mourning Dove – 110
– Yellow-billed Cuckoo – 1
– Great Horned Owl – 1
– Chimney Swift – 5
– Ruby-throated Hummingbird – 3
– Belted Kingfisher – 9
– Red-headed Woodpecker – 2 (1 adult,1 heard only)
– Red-bellied Woodpecker – 9
– Downy Woodpecker – 28
– Hairy Woodpecker – 1
– Northern Flicker – 11
– Pileated Woodpecker – 1 (only second record in history of monthly census)
– Eastern Wood-Pewee – 11
– Willow Flycatcher – 5
– Unidentified Empidonax Flycatcher – 2
– Eastern Phoebe – 1
– Great Crested Flycatcher – 2
– Eastern KIngbird – 10
– Warbling Vireo – 55
– Red-eyed Vireo – 11
– Blue Jay – 45
– American Crow – 1
– Horned Lark – 6
– Tree Swallow – 44
– Barn Swallow – 3
– Black-capped Chickadee – 11
– Tufted Titmouse – 2
– White-breasted Nuthatch – 15
– House Wren – 9
– Marsh Wren – 4
– Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 1
– Veery – 1
– Gray-cheeked Thrush – 1
– Swainson’s Thrush – 31
– American Robin – 127
– Gray Catbird – 61
– Brown Thrasher – 1
– European Starling – 311
– Cedar Waxwing – 21
– Ovenbird – 1
– Black-and-white Warbler – 1
– Prothonotary Warbler – 1
– Tennessee Warbler – 2
– Nashville Warbler – 1
– Common Yellowthroat – 10
– American Redstart – 7
– Cape May Warbler – 4
– Magnolia Warbler – 2
– Bay-breasted Warbler – 1
– Blackburnian Warbler – 2
– Yellow Warbler – 1
– Blackpoll Warbler – 3
– Black-throated Blue Warbler – 1
– Yellow-rumped Warbler – 2
– Canada Warbler – 1
– Wilson’s Warbler – 1
– Savannah Sparrow – 1
– Song Sparrow – 13
– Swamp Sparrow – 2
– Scarlet Tanager – 4
– Northern Cardinal – 16
– Rose-breasted Grosbeak – 1
– Indigo Bunting – 10
– Bobolink – 6
– Red-winged Blackbird – 675
– Common Grackle – 121
– Brown-headed Cowbird – 1
– Baltimore Oriole – 9
– House Finch – 6
– American Goldfinch – 65
– House Sparrow – 14

III. REPTILES: 3 SPECIES.
– Map Turtle – 7
– Midland Painted Turtle – 8
– Northern Water Snake – 1 (young)

IV. AMPHIBIANS: 3 SPECIES.
– Bullfrog
– Green Frog
– Northern Leopard Frog

V. FISHES: 3 SPECIES.
– Bowfin – 8
– Gizzard Shad – thousands (being fed on by Bowfin)
– Brown Bullhead – about 60 (in the ditch along gravel Krause Rd. – between 2″ and 12”)

VI. BUTTERFLIES: 12 SPECIES.
– Cabbage Butterfly – 20+
– Clouded Sulphur – 40+
– Dainty Sulphur – 2
– Bronze Copper – 1
– Summer Azure – 4
– Pearl Crescent – 9
– Red Admiral – 2
– Buckeye – 1
– Red-spotted Purple – 2
– Viceroy – 7
– Monarch – 24
– Least Skipper – 16

Douglas W. Vogus – Akron, Ohio.

 

Posted in Other Vectors | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Birding Then and Now – Red Knot

Yesterday was International Vulture Awareness Day. Today is World Shorebirds Day. It’s hard to keep up with all the conservation events out there, but I like the idea that the Red Knot has been selected to be the 2015 “Shorebird of the Year” – as hokey as that sounds. I saw Red Knots once as a kid, circa 1969, either at Cape May or Cape Cod. I wish eBird had been around 50 years ago so I could retrieve details from it to refresh my memory! Several migrating Red Knots have been reported in northern Ohio since mid-August. So they do pass through my current whereabouts.

About the image: Red Knot (Calidris canutus rufa) is the 2015 ‘Shorebird of the Year’. [© Brad Winn/Manomet] via World Shorebirds Day:

The World Shorebirds Day is a celebration. Shorebirds, those extreme migrants, as well as people, who do the most for them, are celebrated each year, on the 6th of September. Come and learn more about this event!
 The Global Shorebird Counting is a program of the World Shorebirds Day, aiming to popularize bird monitoring and regular counting as a base of effective conservation.

 

Posted in Birding Then and Now | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Today is International Vulture Awareness Day

Logo for International Vulture Awarenerss Day 2015

  • International Vulture Awareness Day, Saturday 5th September 2015
    The first Saturday in September each year is International Vulture Awareness Day. | Vultures are an ecologically vital group of birds that face a range of threats in many areas that they occur. Populations of many species are under pressure and some species are facing extinction. | The International Vulture Awareness Day has grown from Vulture Awareness Days run by the Birds of Prey Programme in South Africa and the Hawk Conservancy Trust in England, who decided to work together and expand the initiative into an international event. | It is now recognised that a co-ordinated international day will publicise the conservation of vultures to a wider audience and highlight the important work being carried out by the world’s vulture conservationists. | On the first Saturday in September, the aim is for each participating organisation to carry out their own activities that highlight vulture conservation and awareness. This website, established in July 2009, provides a central place for all participants to outline these activities and see the extent of vulture conservation across the world. | Additionally this webpage is a valuable resource for vulture workers to learn about the activities of their colleagues and to perhaps develop new collaborations or exchange information.
  • Three Cheers for the Amazing Asian Vulture | USFWS Open Spaces Blog 090215
    In 2012, [USFWS] funded the establishment of a vulture restaurant in Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve in Nepal. | Vulture restaurants don’t serve vulture, they serve carcasses to vultures, and they are an important way to help recover vultures – in Asia, IUCN, the International Union for Conservation of Nature, classifies four species as Critically Endangered. | This is largely due to a drug given to livestock. | In Asian countries, people give diclofenac, a drug similar to aspirin or ibuprofen, to livestock to ease arthritic pain. | But vultures are hyper-sensitive to diclofenac. When they feed on livestock carcasses that had received the drug when they were alive, vultures die. And vulture population numbers have tumbled drastically since the drug came into use. | IUCN says that the white-rumped vulture was at one time called “possibly the most abundant large bird of prey in the world,” adding that its overall population “almost certainly numbered several million individuals.” But since the mid-1990s, IUCN says, “it has suffered a catastrophic decline (over 99%) across the Indian subcontinent,” and IUCN puts the total population now at less than 15,000.
  • Male Condor #509 Feeds Nestling FB 090315
    Bird Cams What attentive parents! Last evening male parent # 509 returned to the nest site to feed the chick. Check out the impressive shadows of the adult wings when he arrived and the view of the steep valley beyond the nest site.

    Keep watching: AllAboutBirds.org/condors

Posted in Birds | Tagged , , | Leave a comment